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    Talentierte Mr Ripley


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    5
    On 21.09.2020
    Last modified:21.09.2020

    Summary:

    2 Kleiderstndern und legt er dann von FULLTV im heimischen Schlafzimmer schon lange nachdenken und um wachsen zu retten.

    Talentierte Mr Ripley

    Eine teuflische Figur, dieser Mr. Ripley: Statt des üblichen rechtschaffenen Detektivs ist Patricia Highsmiths Krimiheld eine Bestie. Tom Ripley erwartet mit Der Talentierte Mr. Ripley (German Edition) [Highsmith, Patricia] on triboulet.eu *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Der Talentierte Mr. Ripley (German. Der talentierte Mr. Ripley. ()2 Std. 13 Min Playboy Dickie Greenleaf genießt mit seiner Verlobten Marge im Italien der fünfziger Jahre das Dolce Vita.

    Talentierte Mr Ripley Inhaltsverzeichnis

    In Italien spürt der mittellose Tom Ripley den Millionärssohn Dickie auf, um ihn zurück nach Amerika zu locken. Begeistert von dem wohlhabenden Lebensstil nimmt er immer mehr Dickies Persönlichkeit an. Schließlich bringt Ripley Dickie bei einem. Der talentierte Mr. Ripley (Film) – Wikipedia. Der talentierte Mr. Ripley (engl. The Talented Mr. Ripley) ist ein Kriminalroman der US-amerikanischen Autorin Patricia Highsmith aus dem Jahr und der. triboulet.eu: Finden Sie Der talentierte Mr. Ripley in unserem vielfältigen DVD- & Blu-ray-Angebot. Gratis Versand durch Amazon ab einem Bestellwert von 29€. Der talentierte Mr. Ripley. ()2 Std. 13 Min Playboy Dickie Greenleaf genießt mit seiner Verlobten Marge im Italien der fünfziger Jahre das Dolce Vita. Als Vorlage für den Film „Der talentierte Mr. Ripley” diente der gleichnamige Roman von Patricia Highsmith aus dem Jahr Es ist die zweite Verfilmung des. Eine teuflische Figur, dieser Mr. Ripley: Statt des üblichen rechtschaffenen Detektivs ist Patricia Highsmiths Krimiheld eine Bestie. Tom Ripley erwartet mit

    Talentierte Mr Ripley

    Der talentierte Mr. Ripley. ()2 Std. 13 Min Playboy Dickie Greenleaf genießt mit seiner Verlobten Marge im Italien der fünfziger Jahre das Dolce Vita. Der talentierte Mr. Ripley (engl. The Talented Mr. Ripley) ist ein Kriminalroman der US-amerikanischen Autorin Patricia Highsmith aus dem Jahr und der. triboulet.eu: Finden Sie Der talentierte Mr. Ripley in unserem vielfältigen DVD- & Blu-ray-Angebot. Gratis Versand durch Amazon ab einem Bestellwert von 29€.

    Talentierte Mr Ripley - Literatur­klassiker

    Nach Der talentierte Mr. Kriminalroman Nachkriegszeit. Jetzt gilt Dickie als verschollen, die Polizei hat aber schon den gefälschten Brief entdeckt. Sell on Amazon Start a Selling Account. Mit der ihnen gemeinsamen Verachtung für Regina-Palast Leipzig Familien denkt sie, in Ripley L-Word Greenleaf einen verwandten Geist gefunden zu haben. Der Streit darüber führt zum Bruch zwischen den beiden. Frustriert und hasserfüllt denkt Tom daran, Dickie umzubringen. Man fiebert mit. Melanie Aus d. Talentierte Mr Ripley

    In fact, he's probably a sociopath. He doesn't seem to be comfortable in his own skin, preferring to live a lie than to be himself.

    He's a liar, thief, and eventually a murderer. Since there are more of these books, I'm guessing he continues his lying murdering impersonating ways.

    The book is mostly the Tom Ripley show. Dickie and the rest of the supporting cast don't have much going on other than the way Ripley manipulates them.

    Actually, having never seen the movie, I was surprised at Dickie Greenleaf's fate considering I expected him and Tom to start making out at any moment.

    Did the movie have this big of a closeted gay vibe? Like I said before, this reads like a mannerly Jim Thompson book once things start coming unglued.

    It takes a lot of lying and killing to cover up a murder. I was a little surprised the body count wasn't higher once everything was said and done.

    I guess that means Patricia Highsmith knew a thing or two about writing. Four stars but I'm not in a tremendous hurry to read more about Tom Ripley.

    View all 18 comments. Ripley is a psychological thriller novel by Patricia Highsmith. This novel introduced the character of Tom Ripley, who returns in four subsequent novels known collectively as the Ripliad.

    It has been adapted numerous times for film, including the film of the same name. View all 7 comments. First off, Mr.

    Tom Ripley is no sociopath. While he is skilled at social manipulation, this is not out of the need to hide the fact that he has no capacity for emotion.

    Judging by his frequent mood swings, he most likely has some flavor of manic-depressive disorder. Now, with that out of the way, we can begin.

    Identity is a tricky business. If it was anything but, I wouldn't have found this book nearly as fascinating as I did.

    Murder mysteries are not my cup of tea, and while the setting was deli First off, Mr. Murder mysteries are not my cup of tea, and while the setting was delightful in its foreignness and experiencing the story from the culpable person's viewpoint was interesting in itself, these aspects would not have balanced out my lack of interest in the details of the plot.

    Lucky for the book, one particular aspect of the narrator made the story much more engaging than it would have been without, one that is encompassed here: Being Tom Ripley had one compensation, at least: it relieved his mind of guilt for the stupid, unnecessary murder of view spoiler [Freddie Miles hide spoiler ].

    What a line! This narrator was guilty regardless of who he thinks he is, that much is sure. But somehow, the mental acrobatics that enabled him to line themselves up with a different identity, also absolved him in his mind of a murder!

    How was this accomplished? Did he actually believe that he was a different person at the time of the crime, and that both identity and its guilt are determined by a state of mind rather than physical form?

    Why not? Don't we do that all the time? A change in a state of both being and mind that absolves one of guilt. Then there are the medium examples of getting married, having kids, modifying your identity through the addition of a new relationship that makes you someone's parent or spouse.

    Perhaps, in the case of marriage, absolving you of feeling guilt about having a child out of wedlock. And then you have the rather trivial examples of changing your appearance or acquiring a material object of some significance.

    How about a tattoo removal that also removes the feeling of guilt caused by a not so pristine past? Your identity shifts with all of these changes.

    It's not only a matter of who you are, but how long that who lasts. Here's a personal example. A few months ago I was well on my way to getting a degree as a bioengineer.

    Nearly there, in fact. But things change, and today I am looking to forward to majoring in English. In essence, I killed Aubrey the bioengineer, appropriated their social status, mental capabilities, and physical form, and am now living out my life as Aubrey the English major, same in practically everything except for determined career path.

    Aubrey the bioengineer was feeling guilty about not having found a research lab position. Aubrey the English major has no use for such feelings.

    Not only had I done away with feelings of guilt, I had done it in such a way that I will never be convicted of a crime, because unlike Tom and his appropriated Dickey identity, all of this happened in my head.

    Strange way to think of it, isn't it. Now, can you imagine Mr. Tom Ripley, master of social manipulation and integration into the selves of others, on the Internet?

    It'd take him a while to get used to the lack of body language and other visual cues, but he'd get the hang of it eventually.

    Would make for an interesting story, that. View all 43 comments. Mar 29, Kelly and the Book Boar rated it really liked it Shelves: liburrrrrry-book , read-in , nutters.

    I ended up with a super stinker as my first selection, but luckily I fared better with The Talented Mr. No spoilers on this one, friends. That was about it, though.

    I had never seen the movie because this. Damon is a pleasant fellow, but I want to slap the crap out of him whenever I see him.

    How will I ever deal with the movie version of The Martian????? Ohhhhhh woe is me! The one thing that might be worth taking a little looksee is this.

    Anyway, enough about the movie I never saw. This is a book review and obviously a super highbrow one at that. For a story that is 60 years old, The Talented Mr.

    Ripley holds up to the test of time remarkably well. Half star removed because there are FOUR more of these in the series? View all 17 comments.

    I've been dabbling in some of the classic thriller writers. Georges Simenon and Leonardo Sciascia , too. It is summer in the northern hemisphere after all.

    Ripley will have you squirming in your seat. Tom Ripley is a man with champagne tastes and a beer pocket book. He possesses very low self-esteem, very little money and he is undoubtedly a closeted queer.

    He likes queers, likes to be among them, but doesn't like admitting to himself that this is so. Ripley's talent is an e I've been dabbling in some of the classic thriller writers.

    Ripley's talent is an extraordinary gift for forgery, impersonation, mimicry and murder which with him become a form of self delusion.

    Add to this nerves of steel in the midst of interrogation, including the ability to formulate convincing fictions that is on a par with his creator, and you have the makings of more than a few hair-raising scenes.

    Dickie's father tracks Tom Ripley down in a New York bar. For some reason, he thinks that Tom's friendship with his son was consequential in a way it never was.

    Greenleaf offers to cover Tom's costs if he will go to Italy and talk Dickie into returning home. Alas, Mama Greenleaf is dying of cancer. Tom goes over, immediately becomes jealous of Marge, Dickie's lover.

    She repulses him in every way; women in general sicken him. Tom charms Dickie and moves in with him, estranging him from Marge.

    He is so in love with him and doesn't even know it. He is also very envious of Dicky's tremendous wealth and advantages. Tom begins to see a way in which he might subsume Dickie.

    So when Dickie intimates that Tom is queer, as he unquestionably is, Tom kills him with an oar in a motorboat then anchors his corpse to the sea floor.

    Well, that's all you need to know to get started. What follows is a masquerade in which Tom switches places with Dickie and back again to foil the ever present policia.

    A novel of plot and lots of fun. A real knucklebiter. Highly recommended. Rating: 4. This fondness turns o Rating: 4. Ripley—is up to his tricks in a 90s film and also Rene Clement's 60s film, "Purple Noon.

    What can I add to the generations of praise heaped on Highsmith's male alter ego? What else need be said? What delicious evil, what glamourous grue, and told with such economy of language!

    Well, for one thing, Tom's as bent as a bow, and because the book came out! Greenleaf and Marge was a big ol' fag hag and Daddy Greenleaf was sending Tom to Italy in hopes that a cute boy would succeed where a revolted father failed to convince his queer son to return to a soul-killing life of pretending to be straight.

    And now that I'v delivered the post-Stonewallization of the book, I return to the text as presented. The characters are all deftly drawn to present us their essences in a short burst: Tom cruising bars and letting an older man Pa Greenleaf pick him up; Dickie resisting Tom's charm until Marge, acting as wing man, throws them together; Marge then doing the twist as she sees her efforts rewarded with too much success.

    It's all done in 30pp and it's set from there on, so suspense has to be created with audacity on the writer's part.

    We're drawn into Tom's troublingly untroubled world of crime, we're seduced into seeing the problems of Tom's murders from his point of view as puzzles to be solved in order to protect his now-customary lifestyle.

    It's a very difficult feat to pull off. It's even more amazing when one considers the author, a big ol' dyke, was writing in one of Murrica's most homophobic AND law-and-order obsessed eras.

    Highsmith, from all reports an unpleasant person to know, does this difficult balancing act with an assured hand at the storytelling tiller and a character-compass that pointed true north at all times.

    This is high quality storytelling, done in simple, unadorned prose. It is very much recommended and it's worth your time. View all 5 comments.

    Actual rating: 2. It wasn't the worst book I have ever read or anything like that, but there were times when I disliked it quite a bit. The writing style just was not for me.

    There was a lot of telling instead of showing, something I dislike severely. Because of this, I often felt disconnected and like I missed some vital information of character development.

    It seemed like the story was constantly two steps ahead of me Actual rating: 2. It seemed like the story was constantly two steps ahead of me and I just couldn't follow.

    Thus, I felt kind of bored and disappointed. Even though the plot points were actually really interesting. The execution just wasn't for me.

    Which is a shame, because I quite liked the characters and cared for them, but all in all, it just View 2 comments.

    Oct 09, Candi rated it really liked it Shelves: mystery-crime , book-i-own. Viewing everything from his perspective was fascinating and disturbing.

    I'm not sure if I was supposed to identify with him or not! I certainly never felt any empathy towards him, but at times, while not "His stories were good because he imagined them intensely, so intensely that he came to believe them.

    I certainly never felt any empathy towards him, but at times, while not exactly rooting for him, I still felt as if I was placed in the position of a partner in his exploits.

    Ripley is an intense psychological thriller that builds to the peak of suspense a bit slowly and then erupts to a biting your nails, edge of your seat kind of pitch.

    I went into this book mostly unaware of the plot — I think this is the best way to enjoy this book. If you've seen the movie already or read too many descriptions of the story line, then I would imagine this would lessen the jolt you would otherwise experience.

    The vivid descriptions of Italy are captivating and I found myself wanting to visit this country even more earnestly than before.

    Having read the book, the movie will likely be less sensational; but the promise of being able to view the beautiful scenery on my television screen has me greatly anticipating watching this regardless.

    I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in a classic and rather brilliant psychological thriller. I have deducted one star only due to the fact that I reached a point where I felt this became slightly unbelievable; however the entertainment value allows this to be just a very minor criticism of the book as a whole.

    I was not a big fan of Highsmith's Strangers on a Train , so I wasn't really looking forward to tackling another of her novels.

    Fortunately, I had a much better experience with Tom Ripley. Oh, if only his other acquaintances could say the same.

    Our story begins with Ripley being sent to Italy to talk Dickie Greenleaf, the prodigal son of a wealthy man, into coming home. The two guys hit it off, and spend some time bopping around Europe like two Ken dolls on holiday.

    But things turn ugly when I was not a big fan of Highsmith's Strangers on a Train , so I wasn't really looking forward to tackling another of her novels.

    But things turn ugly when Ripley senses his time as Dickie's favorite toy may be coming to an end. Written in , this one manages to stand the test of time, and still seems fresh and surprising.

    Highsmith featured her character Ripley in four more novels. This is a damn fine thriller, and one of those make-you-feel-skeevy-rooting-for-the-bad-guy books.

    On the whole, I enjoyed it very much. My only complaint? One of the same problems I had with Strangers on a Train : how can a female writer create such bland and uninteresting female characters?

    No wonder no one wants to hang out with poor Marge. She's not only boring, she's annoying as hell. Ripley's the star of this show, and oh, how he shines.

    I am tempted to follow him into another book just to see what happens next. There's still plenty of time if you'd like to join us for the discussion.

    Martinis and pernod are recommended. View all 11 comments. Mar 26, Jon Nakapalau rated it it was amazing Shelves: crime , psychology , favorites , classics.

    One of the most chilling characters in literature I have ever encountered. Tom Ripley is all the more horrifying because of his total lack of empathy; someone who has looked into the abyss and thinks nothing of pushing others into it while laughing.

    View all 6 comments. Apr 22, Bradley rated it really liked it Shelves: shelf , mystery. Honestly, I'm of two minds on this one.

    The first is just how much fun I had running around with a trust fund buddy and the scam, enjoying 50's Italy, and especially the really delicious riffs from so many of the great authors doing their thing in the day, the subversion and the dark twist.

    I mean, we're all super-familiar with the heroic anti-heroic murderer protagonist, and some of us might be extremely familiar with it if they've read practically any mystery novels or watched ANY tv at all..

    I mean, we're all super-familiar with the heroic anti-heroic murderer protagonist, and some of us might be extremely familiar with it if they've read practically any mystery novels or watched ANY tv at all We'll ignore how much we love Richard the Third or the long line of True Crime novels or the Penny Dreadfuls, for now.

    This is the world of anti-hero worship, after all, thank you Dexter and Darth Vader. I remember watching the movie and have a great time with it, too, in the theater.

    Little did I know that I was missing out on great books, too. What's not to love? And so I go to my second mind. Closet homosexuality. This novel, with so many others of the time including movies, always made the bad guys homosexuals.

    This is trope made tripe and it's as stale as it is insulting and almost entirely distasteful to modern readers, if it wasn't already so to people back then.

    I chose to read it as a buddy novel gone really wrong instead of thinly-veiled homosexuality, and I enjoyed it more, but the question still remains.

    I can write it off as a sign of the times or general ignorance or a cynical pandering to popular conceptions, or I can think again and be sad that such an otherwise interesting and cool novel should now be relegated to the back-shelf of history because of the implicit homophobia it exhibits, even if there was never an explicit hate comment.

    I'm willing to be generous, though. One doesn't toss out decades of literature just because the societal norms of today has changed significantly from those of our grandparents or great grandparents.

    We twist our noses and complain of the stench, but we still enjoy what is GOOD about what we've just read. That's where I'm standing, anyway. View all 24 comments.

    This classic novel of suspense lives up to the hype. I was familiar with the story of Tom Ripley because I had seen the Matt Damon movie, and the book was just as good as other readers had promised.

    Ripley is skilled at manipulating people, lying, impersonations, con jobs and feigning interest in others. What terrifies him is 1 getting caught and 2 being himself.

    It's a classic case of someone who feels arrogant and snide toward others but who also hates himself and feels like he doesn't fit i This classic novel of suspense lives up to the hype.

    It's a classic case of someone who feels arrogant and snide toward others but who also hates himself and feels like he doesn't fit in anywhere, unless he's impersonating someone else.

    In this first book in the Ripley series, he takes on the identity of Richard "Dickie" Greenleaf, who is a wealthy young man living in Italy. After living Dickie's life for several months, Ripley realizes he can't keep up the charade anymore because the police are looking for Dickie, and Tom has to revert to being himself again.

    He hated becoming Thomas Ripley again, hated being nobody, hated putting on his old set of habits again, and feeling that people looked down on him and were bored with him unless he put on an act for them like a clown, feeling incompetent and incapable of doing anything with himself except entertaining people for minutes at a time.

    He hated going back to himself as he would have hated putting on a shabby suit of clothes. Clearly I need to read more Patricia Highsmith. View all 3 comments.

    When the film adaptation of The Talented Mr. Ripley was released, I remember reading a lengthy magazine article that discussed all the things about the book that were changed for the movie.

    I don't remember now what any of those changes were, but I do remember that I came away from the article thinking the book didn't sound very good.

    Thus, even though I had a copy of it, I avoided reading it for years and years. In it finally occurred to me that the book wouldn't have the staying powe When the film adaptation of The Talented Mr.

    In it finally occurred to me that the book wouldn't have the staying power it does if there weren't something to it.

    I finally gave it a try and was amazed by how absorbing it was. Ripley is like an elaborate puzzle that Tom Ripley is constantly working, figuring out how to get himself into and out of treacherous situations entirely of his own making.

    While he's obviously some kind of psychopath, Ripley is also oddly sympathetic; Highsmith delves into his past and his psyche just enough to help the reader understand him, but thankfully without crossing over into sentimentality.

    It's a fantastic portrait, and I rooted for him the whole way through despite his pileup of bad deeds and appalling rationalizations.

    I truly loved every minute of this and was sorry when it was over. This isn't the kind of book I'm generally compelled to reach for, and I doubt I'll read any of the sequels.

    Ripley is just about perfect. View all 12 comments. Jun 07, Glenn Sumi rated it it was amazing Shelves: , classics , guardian I don't know how Patricia Highsmith did it.

    But she got me to root for a psychopathic murderer. Tom Ripley is a smart, nondescript young man in his 20s barely scraping by in s Manhattan.

    When the wealthy father of an acquaintance offers to pay him to go to Italy to convince his aspiring artist son to return to America, Tom can't believe his luck.

    An all expenses paid trip to Europe? To hang out on beaches, drink cocktails and visit galleries? Alas, things don't go as planned.

    The son, Ri I don't know how Patricia Highsmith did it. The son, Richard or Dickie Greenleaf, is happy with his life painting in a sun-drenched village on the Amalfi coast.

    He's also got a sort of relationship with another ex-pat, Marge Sherwood, and is perfectly content where he is.

    Soon Tom becomes obsessed with Dickie. He wants his life — the leisure, the trust fund, the nice clothes. Perhaps he even wants Dickie himself.

    So some bad things happen. Tom — who's got a gift for impersonation and improvisation — covers them up. But one lie begets another, and another.

    Soon other bad things happen. And then people start investigating: Marge, Italian police officers, Dickie's father, an American detective Can the resourceful Tom not only cover his tracks but stay a step ahead of everyone?

    The film introduced another major character not in the book. Also, this is the first of five Ripley books, so you know he survives to go on to other adventures.

    But Highsmith is such a good writer that she keeps you constantly on edge. She also fills in Tom's backstory so you sympathize with him. His parents died when he was young, and he was raised by a cold, judgemental aunt.

    He was never the popular kid, always an outsider. Doesn't he deserve some happiness? True friendship? Who among us hasn't envied — and perhaps resented — the beautiful and privileged one-percent?

    What's fascinating to a contemporary reader is how submerged Tom's same-sex desires are. I'm not sure what a typical s reader would have thought, but it's pretty clear that he's in love with Dickie; Highsmith, who wrote the ahead-of-its-time classic lesbian novel Carol under a pen name, depicts both men's private lives in a suggestive, tantalizing way that was probably clear in its implications to queer readers at the time.

    It's also amusing to think how a modern-day Tom Ripley would flourish in the digital world. Imagine what he could discover about people through Instagram and Google.

    Repressed desires; elegant clothes; lavish European settings including Rome, the Cote d'Azur, Naples and Venice ; shakers full of martinis; plus a murder or two and a generous helping of guilt — what's not to love?

    A classic novel that shouldn't be relegated to genre fiction. View all 8 comments. So cool, so dark, this is one of those books that can be rushed through for the surface story of the suave psychopath, Tom Ripley, and his iconic encounter with poor little rich boy, Dickie Greenleaf green leaf, ha!

    Highsmith is brilliant at inserting tiny moments of unease and offness, sometimes just a word in an unexpected place, and in contrasting her scenes: the dim, smoky bar where Ripley meets Greenleaf seni So cool, so dark, this is one of those books that can be rushed through for the surface story of the suave psychopath, Tom Ripley, and his iconic encounter with poor little rich boy, Dickie Greenleaf green leaf, ha!

    Highsmith is brilliant at inserting tiny moments of unease and offness, sometimes just a word in an unexpected place, and in contrasting her scenes: the dim, smoky bar where Ripley meets Greenleaf senior giving rise to the bright sunshine of Italy where the shadiest things happen.

    She also makes fine uses of literary tropes: the eroticised triangle though where do Ripley's real interests lie? So much is beneath the surface and we're on tenterhooks for what might float up into view.

    A masterclass in tension, in refusing to overwrite, in holding back the physical violence so that when it erupts it's sickening, in unnerving the reader as much through exposing our fictional alliances as in the story itself.

    I've read so many tame imitations of Highsmith's Ripley plot - this original is more dynamic and downright nail-biting than all of them put together!

    How can Highsmith write about such a character, a murderer that you somehow end up rooting for him! Very clever. View all 4 comments. Apr 26, Algernon Darth Anyan rated it liked it Shelves: Shall I go on?

    What Mr. Ripley leaves out from his resume is his readiness to murder anybody he sees as an obstacle in his path to personal happiness.

    He wants all the perks of wealth and leisure, but he wants them right now, while he is still young. Even worse, he feels entitled to a life of riches and the respect of the gentle folks, probably out of his exalted opinion of his own cleverness and out of a feeling discriminated against in childhood by an authorian aunt.

    Everything Tom Ripley ever wanted seems within his grasp when he somehow ingratiates himself with Mr. Greenleaf, an older New York industrialist, from whom he extracts money for a trip to Italy, there to convince his son Dickie to return home.

    Dickie has given up his place in the family business in order to pursue a painting career in Mongibello, a small seaside town near Napoli.

    And money besides, to take trips if he wanted to. Tom envied him with a heartbreaking surge of envy and self-pity.

    The novel is more an exploration of the character of a sociopath than a conventional whodunit. I guess my reaction is normal, exactly what the writer wanted from the audience.

    I should have been more worried if I actually felt sorry for Tom. And, for those who love Italy like me, the book is quite accomplished as a tourist guide, praising the attractions of Venice, San Remo, Rome, Napoli, Capri, Cinqueterre, etc.

    He liked the fact that Venice had no cars. It made the city human. The streets were like veins, he thought, and the people the blood, circulating everywhere.

    If you wanted to be cheerful, or melancholic, or wistful, or thoughtful, or courteous, you simply had to act those things with every gesture.

    He could look like a country gentleman, a thug, an Englishman, a Frenchman, or a plain American eccentric, depending on how he wore it.

    Tom amused himself with it in front of the mirror. Risks are what made the whole thing fun exclaims Tom at one point, ignoring previous moments of nail-biting terror and panic and promising more dirty deeds for the follow-up novels.

    I could spend more time on Tom, trying to decypher the puzzle of his sexuality and what influence it had on his pathological need to hide and to playact instead of being himself.

    Or on his fear of women and denial of homosexual attraction towards Dickie. On his obsessing over clothes and fascination with mirrors, with fine art and haute cuisine.

    Indeed, I could see the novel as a subject of study in medical schools, students being graded over how many symptoms of mental illness they can identify.

    But new titles are already claiming my attention. I probably will read the next Ripley books, but before that I might try other Patricia Highsmith titles Strangers on a Train beckons me at the moment , hoping to have a less repulsive reaction towards the main character.

    This book got under my skin. The narrator, Tom Ripley, is a sociopath who is one troubled and sinister character.

    Upon accepting his proposal, the tale of obsession and deception begins as Tom Ripley weaves his life into a tangled web, and what he manages to pull off is appalling.

    This story requires a tolerance for unlikable characters, as Tom is a violent, manipulating, pathological liar This book got under my skin. This story requires a tolerance for unlikable characters, as Tom is a violent, manipulating, pathological liar who is lacking self esteem.

    Since the book is from his perspective it was disturbing reading his calculated thoughts he expressed. As despicable as this character was I almost feel guilty saying I liked the book, but I was definitely not rooting for him.

    View all 23 comments. He loved possessions, not masses of them, but a select few that he did not part with.

    They gave a man self-respect. Not ostentation but quality, and the love that cherished the quality.

    Possessions reminded him that he existed, and made him enjoy his existence. It was as simple as that. And wasn't that worth something?

    He existed. Not many people in the world knew how to, even if they had the money. It really didn't take money, masses of money, it took a certain security.

    The Talented Mr Ripley w He loved possessions, not masses of them, but a select few that he did not part with. Since then, I have read a few other books by Highsmith and about her, too.

    I am still in awe of her writing with every new book I pick up, but The Talented Mr Ripley remains special to me. Tom Ripley is a deeply disturbed character, who is described first in the book as a sort of failure at life.

    Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews.

    Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. The Talented Mr. In late s New York, Tom Ripley, a young underachiever, is sent to Italy to retrieve Dickie Greenleaf, a rich and spoiled millionaire playboy.

    But when the errand fails, Ripley takes extreme measures. Director: Anthony Minghella. Writers: Patricia Highsmith novel , Anthony Minghella screenplay.

    Available on Amazon. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. Recommendations from people. Filmetti non troppo etti.

    Ripley 7. Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Nominated for 5 Oscars. Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Matt Damon Tom Ripley Gwyneth Paltrow Marge Sherwood Jude Law Dickie Greenleaf Cate Blanchett Meredith Logue Philip Seymour Hoffman Freddie Miles Jack Davenport Peter Smith-Kingsley James Rebhorn Herbert Greenleaf Sergio Rubini Inspector Roverini Philip Baker Hall Alvin MacCarron Celia Weston Aunt Joan Fiorello Fausto as Rosario Fiorello Stefania Rocca Silvana Ivano Marescotti Colonnello Verrecchia Anna Longhi Signora Buffi Alessandro Fabrizi Edit Storyline The s.

    Taglines: How far would you go to become someone else? Edit Did You Know? The town is on the Italian Riviera, just a few miles from the border with France.

    Goofs When they are all out to sea, Marge comes out of the water and walks to Tom who sits alone on the boat.

    Water marks are visible on the deck showing evidence of a previous take. Quotes [ first lines ] Tom Ripley : If I could just go back Crazy Credits The opening title uses all the adjectives of the complete title before cutting to the final "The Talented Mr.

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Report this. Add the first question. Country: USA. Language: English Italian.

    Runtime: min.

    Top reviews from other countries. Mit Ripleys latenter und unerfüllter Genug Gesagt thematisiert Patricia Highsmith die Nöte ihrer eigenen komplizierten sexuellen Identität. Er schreibt Dickies Testament, in dem dieser Tom sein ganzes Vermögen vermacht. Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. Dickie hält nichts von diesem verrückten Vorhaben. Unerwartet taucht Freddie Miles in Dickies römischer Wohnung auf und findet dort Tom Ripley vor, der ihn aus der Wohnung hinauskomplimentiert. Sie stirbt am 4. Auflage Übersetzer Melanie Aus d. Freddie Miles schöpft jedoch Verdacht. Der talentierte Mr. Geralds Game Imdb er? Greenleaf, bevor er in die lang ersehnten Ferien nach Griechenland reist. Spannend und lesenswert. Er schreibt an Mr. Dieser hält die zugrundeliegende Kriminalhandlung auf Dauer kaum stand. Paul Ingendaay.

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    Greenleafs Kosten verpflegt. Diese war — laut Anna von Planta, Mitherausgeberin der neu edierten Ausgabe — gegenüber der Originalausgabe leicht gekürzt und wurde für die erste Diogenes-Ausgabe von leicht überarbeitet. It would look worse for him, whatever happened, the longer he put it off. Philip Seymour Hoffman. Holiday Movie Guide Alas, Mama Greenleaf is dying of cancer. Dickie's father travels to Italy to meet with the police, bringing along Fernsehserien.De Legal private detective, Alvin MacCarron. He hated going back to himself as he would have hated Martin Rütter Welpen Beissen on a shabby suit of clothes. National Board Youtube Zusammen Schauen Review. And then whacking them again. Der Talentierte Mr. Ripley (German Edition) [Highsmith, Patricia] on triboulet.eu *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Der Talentierte Mr. Ripley (German. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Der talentierte Mr. Ripley​«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Foto: ©MEYER ORIGINALS. Nach dem frühen Tod seiner Eltern hat Tom Ripley nichts als Benachteiligung und Demütigungen erfahren.

    Jonathan Rosenbaum. On balance, The Talented Mr. Ripley is worth seeing more for its undeniably delightful journey than its final destination.

    Andrew Sarris. Not only is it an elegantly polished affair, with top notch performances all round, and magnificent camerawork and editing, it's also acutely aware of how class, money and sex shape desire and resentment.

    Geoff Andrew. It's all very circuitous and occasionally crafty, but primarily it just goes on for too long.

    Mike Massie. Definitely the best part Matt Damon's ever had and his best performance. It's also my favorite. Murtada Elfadl. Lush, star-studded movies like The Talented Mr.

    Ripley teach us to yearn: for Europe, for charisma, for nice furniture and idler times. The Talented Mr. Ripley also teaches us how poisonous that longing can be.

    Amanda Dobbins. A fascinating and often baffling thriller about assumed identity and naked greed, based on the classic book by Patricia Highsmith.

    Leigh Paatsch. A "10 Best" achievement, thanks to writer-director Anthony Minghella's acute interpretation of Patricia Highsmith's novel, a shooting style that wallows in decadence and danger, and a choice cast completely in sync with the stringent demands of the story.

    Matt Brunson. Carly Kocurek. Top Box Office. More Top Movies Trailers. Certified Fresh Picks. Black Mirror: Season 5.

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    Rate And Review Submit review Want to see. Super Reviewer. Rate this movie Oof, that was Rotten. What did you think of the movie? Step 2 of 2 How did you buy your ticket?

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    How did you buy your ticket? View All Videos 1. View All Photos Movie Info. To be young and carefree amid the blue waters and idyllic landscape of sun-drenched Italy in the late s; that's la dolce vita Tom Ripley Matt Damon craves- and Dickie Greenleaf Jude Law leads.

    When Dickie's father asks Tom to bring his errant playboy son back home to America, Dickie and his beautiful expatriate girlfriend, Marge Sherwood Gwyneth Paltrow , never suspect the dangerous extremes to which Ripley will go to make their lifestyle his own.

    Anthony Minghella. Steve E. Andrews , William Horberg , Tom Sternberg. Aug 1, Matt Damon Tom Ripley. Gwyneth Paltrow Marge Sherwood.

    Jude Law Dickie Greenleaf. Cate Blanchett Meredith Logue. Philip Seymour Hoffman Freddie Miles. Jack Davenport Peter Smith-Kingsley.

    James Rebhorn Herbert Greenleaf. Sergio Rubini Inspector Roverini. Celia Weston Aunt Joan. Anthony Minghella Director. Patricia Highsmith Writer Novel.

    Anthony Minghella Screenwriter. Andrews Producer. William Horberg Producer. Sydney Pollack Executive Producer. Tom Sternberg Producer.

    Paul Zaentz Co-Producer. She's not only boring, she's annoying as hell. Ripley's the star of this show, and oh, how he shines.

    I am tempted to follow him into another book just to see what happens next. There's still plenty of time if you'd like to join us for the discussion.

    Martinis and pernod are recommended. View all 11 comments. Mar 26, Jon Nakapalau rated it it was amazing Shelves: crime , psychology , favorites , classics.

    One of the most chilling characters in literature I have ever encountered. Tom Ripley is all the more horrifying because of his total lack of empathy; someone who has looked into the abyss and thinks nothing of pushing others into it while laughing.

    View all 6 comments. Apr 22, Bradley rated it really liked it Shelves: shelf , mystery. Honestly, I'm of two minds on this one.

    The first is just how much fun I had running around with a trust fund buddy and the scam, enjoying 50's Italy, and especially the really delicious riffs from so many of the great authors doing their thing in the day, the subversion and the dark twist.

    I mean, we're all super-familiar with the heroic anti-heroic murderer protagonist, and some of us might be extremely familiar with it if they've read practically any mystery novels or watched ANY tv at all..

    I mean, we're all super-familiar with the heroic anti-heroic murderer protagonist, and some of us might be extremely familiar with it if they've read practically any mystery novels or watched ANY tv at all We'll ignore how much we love Richard the Third or the long line of True Crime novels or the Penny Dreadfuls, for now.

    This is the world of anti-hero worship, after all, thank you Dexter and Darth Vader. I remember watching the movie and have a great time with it, too, in the theater.

    Little did I know that I was missing out on great books, too. What's not to love? And so I go to my second mind.

    Closet homosexuality. This novel, with so many others of the time including movies, always made the bad guys homosexuals.

    This is trope made tripe and it's as stale as it is insulting and almost entirely distasteful to modern readers, if it wasn't already so to people back then.

    I chose to read it as a buddy novel gone really wrong instead of thinly-veiled homosexuality, and I enjoyed it more, but the question still remains.

    I can write it off as a sign of the times or general ignorance or a cynical pandering to popular conceptions, or I can think again and be sad that such an otherwise interesting and cool novel should now be relegated to the back-shelf of history because of the implicit homophobia it exhibits, even if there was never an explicit hate comment.

    I'm willing to be generous, though. One doesn't toss out decades of literature just because the societal norms of today has changed significantly from those of our grandparents or great grandparents.

    We twist our noses and complain of the stench, but we still enjoy what is GOOD about what we've just read. That's where I'm standing, anyway.

    View all 24 comments. This classic novel of suspense lives up to the hype. I was familiar with the story of Tom Ripley because I had seen the Matt Damon movie, and the book was just as good as other readers had promised.

    Ripley is skilled at manipulating people, lying, impersonations, con jobs and feigning interest in others. What terrifies him is 1 getting caught and 2 being himself.

    It's a classic case of someone who feels arrogant and snide toward others but who also hates himself and feels like he doesn't fit i This classic novel of suspense lives up to the hype.

    It's a classic case of someone who feels arrogant and snide toward others but who also hates himself and feels like he doesn't fit in anywhere, unless he's impersonating someone else.

    In this first book in the Ripley series, he takes on the identity of Richard "Dickie" Greenleaf, who is a wealthy young man living in Italy.

    After living Dickie's life for several months, Ripley realizes he can't keep up the charade anymore because the police are looking for Dickie, and Tom has to revert to being himself again.

    He hated becoming Thomas Ripley again, hated being nobody, hated putting on his old set of habits again, and feeling that people looked down on him and were bored with him unless he put on an act for them like a clown, feeling incompetent and incapable of doing anything with himself except entertaining people for minutes at a time.

    He hated going back to himself as he would have hated putting on a shabby suit of clothes. Clearly I need to read more Patricia Highsmith.

    View all 3 comments. When the film adaptation of The Talented Mr. Ripley was released, I remember reading a lengthy magazine article that discussed all the things about the book that were changed for the movie.

    I don't remember now what any of those changes were, but I do remember that I came away from the article thinking the book didn't sound very good.

    Thus, even though I had a copy of it, I avoided reading it for years and years. In it finally occurred to me that the book wouldn't have the staying powe When the film adaptation of The Talented Mr.

    In it finally occurred to me that the book wouldn't have the staying power it does if there weren't something to it.

    I finally gave it a try and was amazed by how absorbing it was. Ripley is like an elaborate puzzle that Tom Ripley is constantly working, figuring out how to get himself into and out of treacherous situations entirely of his own making.

    While he's obviously some kind of psychopath, Ripley is also oddly sympathetic; Highsmith delves into his past and his psyche just enough to help the reader understand him, but thankfully without crossing over into sentimentality.

    It's a fantastic portrait, and I rooted for him the whole way through despite his pileup of bad deeds and appalling rationalizations.

    I truly loved every minute of this and was sorry when it was over. This isn't the kind of book I'm generally compelled to reach for, and I doubt I'll read any of the sequels.

    Ripley is just about perfect. View all 12 comments. Jun 07, Glenn Sumi rated it it was amazing Shelves: , classics , guardian I don't know how Patricia Highsmith did it.

    But she got me to root for a psychopathic murderer. Tom Ripley is a smart, nondescript young man in his 20s barely scraping by in s Manhattan.

    When the wealthy father of an acquaintance offers to pay him to go to Italy to convince his aspiring artist son to return to America, Tom can't believe his luck.

    An all expenses paid trip to Europe? To hang out on beaches, drink cocktails and visit galleries? Alas, things don't go as planned.

    The son, Ri I don't know how Patricia Highsmith did it. The son, Richard or Dickie Greenleaf, is happy with his life painting in a sun-drenched village on the Amalfi coast.

    He's also got a sort of relationship with another ex-pat, Marge Sherwood, and is perfectly content where he is.

    Soon Tom becomes obsessed with Dickie. He wants his life — the leisure, the trust fund, the nice clothes. Perhaps he even wants Dickie himself.

    So some bad things happen. Tom — who's got a gift for impersonation and improvisation — covers them up.

    But one lie begets another, and another. Soon other bad things happen. And then people start investigating: Marge, Italian police officers, Dickie's father, an American detective Can the resourceful Tom not only cover his tracks but stay a step ahead of everyone?

    The film introduced another major character not in the book. Also, this is the first of five Ripley books, so you know he survives to go on to other adventures.

    But Highsmith is such a good writer that she keeps you constantly on edge. She also fills in Tom's backstory so you sympathize with him.

    His parents died when he was young, and he was raised by a cold, judgemental aunt. He was never the popular kid, always an outsider.

    Doesn't he deserve some happiness? True friendship? Who among us hasn't envied — and perhaps resented — the beautiful and privileged one-percent?

    What's fascinating to a contemporary reader is how submerged Tom's same-sex desires are. I'm not sure what a typical s reader would have thought, but it's pretty clear that he's in love with Dickie; Highsmith, who wrote the ahead-of-its-time classic lesbian novel Carol under a pen name, depicts both men's private lives in a suggestive, tantalizing way that was probably clear in its implications to queer readers at the time.

    It's also amusing to think how a modern-day Tom Ripley would flourish in the digital world. Imagine what he could discover about people through Instagram and Google.

    Repressed desires; elegant clothes; lavish European settings including Rome, the Cote d'Azur, Naples and Venice ; shakers full of martinis; plus a murder or two and a generous helping of guilt — what's not to love?

    A classic novel that shouldn't be relegated to genre fiction. View all 8 comments. So cool, so dark, this is one of those books that can be rushed through for the surface story of the suave psychopath, Tom Ripley, and his iconic encounter with poor little rich boy, Dickie Greenleaf green leaf, ha!

    Highsmith is brilliant at inserting tiny moments of unease and offness, sometimes just a word in an unexpected place, and in contrasting her scenes: the dim, smoky bar where Ripley meets Greenleaf seni So cool, so dark, this is one of those books that can be rushed through for the surface story of the suave psychopath, Tom Ripley, and his iconic encounter with poor little rich boy, Dickie Greenleaf green leaf, ha!

    Highsmith is brilliant at inserting tiny moments of unease and offness, sometimes just a word in an unexpected place, and in contrasting her scenes: the dim, smoky bar where Ripley meets Greenleaf senior giving rise to the bright sunshine of Italy where the shadiest things happen.

    She also makes fine uses of literary tropes: the eroticised triangle though where do Ripley's real interests lie? So much is beneath the surface and we're on tenterhooks for what might float up into view.

    A masterclass in tension, in refusing to overwrite, in holding back the physical violence so that when it erupts it's sickening, in unnerving the reader as much through exposing our fictional alliances as in the story itself.

    I've read so many tame imitations of Highsmith's Ripley plot - this original is more dynamic and downright nail-biting than all of them put together!

    How can Highsmith write about such a character, a murderer that you somehow end up rooting for him! Very clever.

    View all 4 comments. Apr 26, Algernon Darth Anyan rated it liked it Shelves: Shall I go on? What Mr. Ripley leaves out from his resume is his readiness to murder anybody he sees as an obstacle in his path to personal happiness.

    He wants all the perks of wealth and leisure, but he wants them right now, while he is still young. Even worse, he feels entitled to a life of riches and the respect of the gentle folks, probably out of his exalted opinion of his own cleverness and out of a feeling discriminated against in childhood by an authorian aunt.

    Everything Tom Ripley ever wanted seems within his grasp when he somehow ingratiates himself with Mr.

    Greenleaf, an older New York industrialist, from whom he extracts money for a trip to Italy, there to convince his son Dickie to return home. Dickie has given up his place in the family business in order to pursue a painting career in Mongibello, a small seaside town near Napoli.

    And money besides, to take trips if he wanted to. Tom envied him with a heartbreaking surge of envy and self-pity. The novel is more an exploration of the character of a sociopath than a conventional whodunit.

    I guess my reaction is normal, exactly what the writer wanted from the audience. I should have been more worried if I actually felt sorry for Tom.

    And, for those who love Italy like me, the book is quite accomplished as a tourist guide, praising the attractions of Venice, San Remo, Rome, Napoli, Capri, Cinqueterre, etc.

    He liked the fact that Venice had no cars. It made the city human. The streets were like veins, he thought, and the people the blood, circulating everywhere.

    If you wanted to be cheerful, or melancholic, or wistful, or thoughtful, or courteous, you simply had to act those things with every gesture. He could look like a country gentleman, a thug, an Englishman, a Frenchman, or a plain American eccentric, depending on how he wore it.

    Tom amused himself with it in front of the mirror. Risks are what made the whole thing fun exclaims Tom at one point, ignoring previous moments of nail-biting terror and panic and promising more dirty deeds for the follow-up novels.

    I could spend more time on Tom, trying to decypher the puzzle of his sexuality and what influence it had on his pathological need to hide and to playact instead of being himself.

    Or on his fear of women and denial of homosexual attraction towards Dickie. On his obsessing over clothes and fascination with mirrors, with fine art and haute cuisine.

    Indeed, I could see the novel as a subject of study in medical schools, students being graded over how many symptoms of mental illness they can identify.

    But new titles are already claiming my attention. I probably will read the next Ripley books, but before that I might try other Patricia Highsmith titles Strangers on a Train beckons me at the moment , hoping to have a less repulsive reaction towards the main character.

    This book got under my skin. The narrator, Tom Ripley, is a sociopath who is one troubled and sinister character. Upon accepting his proposal, the tale of obsession and deception begins as Tom Ripley weaves his life into a tangled web, and what he manages to pull off is appalling.

    This story requires a tolerance for unlikable characters, as Tom is a violent, manipulating, pathological liar This book got under my skin.

    This story requires a tolerance for unlikable characters, as Tom is a violent, manipulating, pathological liar who is lacking self esteem.

    Since the book is from his perspective it was disturbing reading his calculated thoughts he expressed.

    As despicable as this character was I almost feel guilty saying I liked the book, but I was definitely not rooting for him.

    View all 23 comments. He loved possessions, not masses of them, but a select few that he did not part with. They gave a man self-respect.

    Not ostentation but quality, and the love that cherished the quality. Possessions reminded him that he existed, and made him enjoy his existence.

    It was as simple as that. And wasn't that worth something? He existed. Not many people in the world knew how to, even if they had the money.

    It really didn't take money, masses of money, it took a certain security. The Talented Mr Ripley w He loved possessions, not masses of them, but a select few that he did not part with.

    Since then, I have read a few other books by Highsmith and about her, too. I am still in awe of her writing with every new book I pick up, but The Talented Mr Ripley remains special to me.

    Tom Ripley is a deeply disturbed character, who is described first in the book as a sort of failure at life. He's barely able to support himself, he's sponging off friends, he has no motivation to anything, and yet he sees himself as superior to his fellow man and enjoys manipulating people.

    Yet, he is also very afraid of being found out. Not just being found out of various crimes and misdemeanors, but also of being found out to be a failure, a nothing, nobody.

    Because Tom's greatest issue is that he has no personality whatsoever. That makes him as forgettable as it makes him desperate to be recognised.

    He was thinking that he had to identify himself, immediately. It would look worse for him, whatever happened, the longer he put it off. When he left the cathedral he inquired of a policeman where the nearest police station was.

    He asked it sadly. He felt sad. He was not afraid, but he felt that identifying himself as Thomas Phelps Ripley was going to be one of the saddest things he had ever done in his life.

    Now I am not going to try and analyse Tom. I couldn't. It is just that Tom's self-hatred and feelings of unacknowledged superiority set him up to take on any means of escape from his own life that present themselves, and this is where the gripping plot to this book starts off.

    We get to follow Tom on a mission, which he is bound to fail because the whole idea is ludicrous from the start. It does give Tom a new scene, tho, in which he can try and become something, become someone.

    I will not give much of the plot away but suffice it to say, there is murder involved, there is a police hunt across Italy, and there are various close encounters between Tom and other characters where I was just on the edge of my seat to find out how it would resolve.

    Would he get away? I must have spent half my time reading about Tom hoping he would be found out, and the other half hoping that he wouldn't - simply because it was such a thrill to read about this despicable, delusional, pathetic character that is Tom Ripley.

    Re-reading the book after so many years, I knew where the story was going, but was still thrilled by the details that I had forgotten since reading this in the s - details which the film got wrong, by the way.

    Re-reading this also brought out many details about Highsmith's writing that I am not sure I appreciated on the first read: Highsmith toyed with Tom.

    She absolutely works him like a puppet in this story, and you can see that she derives a twisted kind of fun from doing this.

    At times when Tom wallows in self-pity, Highsmith makes us laugh at him. It gave Tom a sick, empty feeling at the pit of his stomach to think that in less than a week he would have water below him, miles deep, and that undoubtedly he would have to look at it most of the time, because people on ocean liners spent most of their time on deck.

    And it was particularly un-chic to be seasick, he felt. He had never been seasick, but he came very near it several times in those last days, simply thinking about the voyage to Cherbourg.

    She daubed at the crocheted tablecloth awkwardly with her napkin. Tom came running back from the kitchen with a wet cloth. It wasn't the tablecloth he cared about, it was the beautiful table.

    Tom hated her. He suddenly remembered her bra hanging over the windowsill in Mongibello. Her underwear would be draped over his chairs tonight, if he invited her to stay here.

    The idea repelled him. He deliberately hurled a smile across the table at her. Not mine," he added, laughing, "but I've got two rooms upstairs and you're welcome to one of them.

    All right, I will. Highsmith had a wicked sense humor, and I do mean "wicked" in the sense of dry, dark and very twisted.

    This comes to full show in Ripley and, on this second read, I could not help but wonder what other nuances of Highsmith's personality may have made their way into the book, too.

    I am assuming that Tom's closetedness may also have been drawn from the author's own experiences, and that the overwhelming amount of alcohol that is described in the book may, sadly, have been another.

    I have no doubt that I will refer back to Ripley - whether as a result of reading more of Highsmith's work or whether as a comparison to other thrillers I may come across.

    In the weirdest of ways, The Talented Mr Ripley has been such a fun book. Written over 50 years ago, Patricia created a unique character whose character arc is the opposite of what is traditional.

    Tom Ripley, a floundering type evolves in ways unimaginable while the story builds momentum. We are immersed into the mind of a schemer who becomes darker with each step.

    A true classic, Highsmith is masterful, her characters interesting and plot twists well executed. I plan to read the two sequels as a result.

    The film that stars Matt Damon follows the book closely, somethi Written over 50 years ago, Patricia created a unique character whose character arc is the opposite of what is traditional.

    The film that stars Matt Damon follows the book closely, something rare with adaptations! This one didn't work for me at all.

    For one, I think this is the first time I will ever say the following words. The movie adaptation is far more powerful than the book.

    Matt Damon was likable as Ripley. The Ripley in this book was fucking boring. Also, there's a character in the movie that is not in the book, and I think he made all the difference, even if he wasn't the center of attention.

    His character made for a much more interesting and emotional ending. Luckily, I read this after having se This one didn't work for me at all.

    Luckily, I read this after having seen the film over a decade ago, because had I read the book first I'd have no desire to watch the film, and that would have been a sad thing.

    Another problem I had with The Talented Mr. Ripley has nothing to do with this book. I rate my read based on experience.

    It is glaringly obvious that Dexter was modeled after Highsmith's formula, which makes me what to go back and drop my ratings of each Dexter novel.

    I dislike coincidence as a plot device. Let me clarify: I do not mind coincidence in books. It is a part of real life. But when your entire plot balances on coincidence getting away with crime after crime because of some fortuitous circumstance , my give-a-fuck drowns like a passenger on the Titanic.

    That is me. That is my subjective opinion. I'll be reading everything on that list. In summation: Patricia Highsmith died in , so I'm sure she won't take offense to me disliking her creation.

    She was a great writer, but this one wasn't for me. Final Judgment: Suck my Dickie. What a creepy little book. Highsmith takes us into the head of Tom Ripley, and it is an unsettling ride.

    Tom is a sociopath or is he? And inside his head, we are carried along as his crimes mount, one upon the other, and feel the tension as he skirts the edge of disaster and discovery.

    Are we tense because we want him to be captured? Or because we want him to get away with it? Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforc What a creepy little book.

    Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here.

    In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook Jan 20, Nancy Oakes rated it it was amazing Shelves: crime-fiction , crime-fiction-america , Spoilers are noted where needed.

    Tom Ripley is an extremely disturbed man. Knowing what we know about him, we probably wouldn't want him to come to dinner, live in our neighborhood, date our daughters or our sons, handle our investments -- in short, after we've gotten to know him, we discover he is someone we would avoid like the plague.

    But all of the above are judgments made from our outside, read if you're interested in the longer post I've made, you can read it at my online reading journal.

    But all of the above are judgments made from our outside, reader point of view. Rereading this novel taught me a valuable lesson -- when accepting an author's invitation to enter the mind of a paranoid psychopath, you may not like where things are heading, but you've made the choice to be party to his point of view for the time being.

    Reading The Talented Mr. Ripley demands that you step into Ripley's brain in order to more fully understand this guy and what makes him tick.

    It's the best and imo the only way to wrap your head around what he does and why he does it. Back in the real world, outside of Ripley's mind, of course the guy's a pathological killer, an amoral bad guy who will stop at nothing to get what he wants.

    He's the ultimate manipulator, the worst kind of bad guy, and someone you would want to never encounter.

    But none of that is applicable while you're inside of his world, where good and evil do not exist, where things just sort of follow a logical progression necessary to achieve his ultimate goals.

    In fact, it's easy to understand why everyone does what they do in this novel, and that's why it works so well, and why it has remained a classic for over sixty years.

    This probably isn't going to sound good, but I feel for Tom Ripley. He embodies all my weakest, most petulant, lowest self-esteem moments - when I find myself asking, "Why don't you like me more?

    Why can't I have what you have? Why can't I take the easy way? Nobody likes Tom. No one's ever really even tolerated him.

    He can't tolerate himself. You root for him not because you like him - you probably don't - but because What wou This probably isn't going to sound good, but I feel for Tom Ripley.

    What would you be like, if no one had ever liked you? Where we think, "Why can't I have what he's having? Ripley sets out to take it. He's ambitious, hard-working, and - in his own way - brave.

    I hope he gets away with it. This series goes downhill pretty quickly, and I suggest you don't bother. Here are my reviews of rest of them: - Ripley Under Ground 4 stars, fine - Ripley's Game 3 stars, blah - The Boy Who Followed Ripley 2 stars and we're well off the rails here, although the result is accidentally funny - Ripley Under Water 1 star, just a dire waste of pages Oh Tom Ripley I clipped through the last pages at work tonite, hungry to know!

    I found myself irked at customers who disturbed my reading, mid-paragraph inconsiderate indecisive patronizing people! No, I don't know what white roses "means"- p Oh Tom Ripley No, I don't know what white roses "means"- pick a damn meaning and be gone!

    But I felt edgy at work. Like the day I first tried caffeine, twitchy. Tom Reeeepley's mind is contagious I tell you. I still feel guilty- though i don't have anything to feel shame or guilt for!

    I am a New Englander, so, to a degree, feeling bad about all I am not doing all I could be etc is normal, but this? This Ripley-brain is far more intense, much more visceral.

    It makes my former Puritan guilt think look like moss beneath a flowering tree on the first day of spring. On a sidenote, the afternoon I bought the book at Powells, one of my rare excursions into the Gold Room I shared the Mystery 'H' aisle with a sophisticated old woman, peach hair, nice slacks, matching shoes and sweater- very nice jacket.

    Maybe it's because I'll be in Florida for a week soon, and I associate that state with old folks mostly , that I couldn't help but dream, lust even, after a Patricia Highsmith mystery club with me and a handful of old ladies with peach and purple hairs and nice slacks and wide brimmed hats At least mine don't involve murder and European identity swaps.

    Or do they?! Aug 21, Char rated it really liked it Shelves: dark-fiction , wickedly-disturbing , psychological-horror , mount-tbr-challenge , crime , wtfuckery.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Of course, he never has to be bored again after brutally murdering his friend and assuming his identity.

    Tom is recruited by Mr. Greenleaf, the father of Tom's acquaintance, Dickie to bring his son home from Italy.

    Tom is even given a hefty sum with which to support himself in Italy while working his come-home-magic on his friend.

    Unfortunately, Ripley has no luck persuading Dickie to do anything, other than to get stumbling drunk nearly every minute of the day.

    Then, shortly after an awkward scene where Tom is caught trying on Dickie's clothes, Tom decides to whack Dickie and that's where this story really begins.

    I'd seen the movie with Matt Damon a long time ago, but I've always been fascinated with the character of Tom Ripley and wanted to read the book for myself.

    In the 50's, stories from the viewpoint of the murderer were rare, not like today. I think it was also rare, feel free to correct me , to have the antagonist be likable at times.

    I mean, there you are, in Ripley's mind rolling along thinking about your afternoon cocktails and that evening's parties and then BAM!

    He's whacking someone across the head with an oar. And then whacking them again. And then across their neck. And then stabbing them with it as if it were a sharp instrument.

    He's wheezing and out of breath and he's still going. And there's the reader, a bit stunned, wondering how we got to this point and where did everything go wrong?

    This right here is what I liked best about the story. Now we have Criminal Minds and FBI profilers that write books about serial killers, sociopaths and the like.

    In the 50's when this book was written, that was not the case. I think Patricia Highsmith had the thought processes of Ripley down pat.

    Nothing is ever his fault. He is just so clever and everyone else so dull and stupid. The depravity of his thoughts are presented so matter-of-fact-ly that they could almost pass for normal.

    Talentierte Mr Ripley Movies / TV Video

    Stefania Rocca - The talented Mr Ripley

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